I AM! We Are Here! Exhibition

I AM! We Are Here!


 

JOIN us For: A film and photographic exposition of vitality and dynamism of Trans*, Queer, Gender Non Conforming & Two Spirit residents of the Bronx


 

4G4A7203.jpg

Art & Film: Seyi Adebanjo

Co-curator: Seyi Adebanjo & Natasha R. Johnson

In Partnership with: The Point CDC, Lola Flash, Naima Green,


 

Sponsored by BAAD! Destination Tomorrow, CK Life & Princess Janae Place


 

This project “I AM! We Are Here! Is made possible with public funds from the Bronx Council on the Arts through the Department of Cultural Affair’s Greater New York Arts Development Fund Program.


 

@ The Point CDC

December 8th artist talk 6-8pm


 

Exhibition Dates

November 11- December 9, 2017,


 

Monday - Saturday 8AM- 9PM


 

On View

The Point CDC

940 Garrison Ave

Bronx NY 10474

6 Train to Hunts Point Av,


 

Walk 5 minutes to the address.


 

more info contact: globalizinggender@gmail.com


 

https://vimeo.com/243102613

 

8 Exciting Trans Filmmakers Shaking Up Hollywood

We love the Wachowskis, but they're not the whole story. It's time to recognize the vibrant community of transgender filmmakers on the rise.

When Lana and Lilly Wachowski, the visionary sibling directors of “The Matrix” and “Sense8, came out as transgender, it was a boon for trans filmmakers everywhere. Suddenly, the Wachowskis’ entire canon of influential science fiction, fantasy (and even “Bound,” their one explicitly queer film) could be seen through a whole different lens. The news turned “The Matrix” into a metaphor for eschewing the gender binary, “Bound” could comfortably be claimed as a lesbian film made by a lesbian, and they were free to make “Sense8” as unabashedly inclusive as they wanted.

So: How many trans directors can you name besides the Wachowskis?

While their influence cannot be overstated, there is a robust crew of transgender filmmakers coming up in their wake. As trans stories become de rigeur, it’s increasingly important that these stories are told by trans people. Only then will we see fewer cisgender actors playing transharmful stereotypes used as plot points, and documentaries that play like after school specials.

Trans people need to tell their own stories. So: If you’re not trans and you want to produce a movie about a trans person, consider hiring one of the directors listed below.

Seyi Adebanjo blends activism with filmmaking so passionately, they even teach at NYU about integrating artistic practice with social change. Raised in New York City and born in Nigeria, their 30-minute doc, “Oya! Something Happened on the Way to West Africa!” is a moving meditation on cultural, spiritual, and racial identities. Comparing attitudes and customs around gender fluidity from New York City to Nigeria, it is a personal film only Adebanjo could have made. Their shorter doc, “Trans Lives Matter!: Justice for Islan Nettles,” was about the murder of a black transgender woman in Harlem in 2013, and was screened by PBS Channel 13.

Bronx Calling: The Fourth AIM BIENNIAL July 22 – October 22, 2017

July 22 – October 22, 2017
Opening reception: Thursday, July 27, 6-8pm

The Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse
Bronx, New York 10456

Museum Hours:
Wed-Sun: 11am-6pm
Mon &Tue: Closed
 

Exhibiting Afromystic Teaser

The search for the Divine Love within through mythology and Yorùbá Spirituality

In Nigeria, Brazil & United States.

Afromystic experiments with ritual, the erotic, and gender representation through indigenous Yorùbá spirituality. The live action film weaves together the real and imagined in “cinematic flux” or hybrid through animation of mythology. 

In a world where LGBTQ practitioners are told they have no place or right to be alive, five Afromystics boldly risk everything to share their truth and their rightful place in the traditions of Yorùbá spirituality.

Afromystic is a afro-surrealism docu-fiction that inspires all people to experience the Divine love within.  These five LGBTQ leaders in the Yorùbá tradition invite us into a world rarely seen, where deities change gender and Queer priests are heroes; are leaders. Where deity is born from the love of two womyn.

The Fourth AIM Biennial
"The Fourth AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists from the 2016 and 2017 classes of the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program. AIM provides professional development resources to emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. The exhibition is organized by Aylet Ojeda Jequin, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana; and the Bronx Museum’s Christine Licata, Director of Community and Public Programs; and, Heather Reyes, Exhibitions and Collections Manager."

Participating Artists:
Seyi Adebanjo, Constanza Alarcon-Tennen, Francheska Alcantara, Amanda Alfieri, Setare Arashloo, Sabrina Barrios, Milcah Bassel, Laura Bernstein, Leo Castaneda, Kiran Chandra, Jesse Chun, Clare Churchouse, Maya Ciarrocchi, Lionel Cruet, Craig Damrauer, Sophia Dawson, Rose DeSiano, Luba Drozd, Carrie Elston Tunick, Dolores Furtado, Dhanashree Gadiyar, Ivan Gaete, Ana Garces Kiley, Pablo Garcia, Dakota Gearhart, Michelle Gevint, Naima Green, Uraline Septembre Hager, Kathie Halfin, Bang Geul Han, Amber Heaton, Robert Hernandez, Chika, Sara Jimenez, Merritt Johnson, Dominika Ksel, Stephanie Lindquist, Tammy Kiku Logan, Lulu Meng, Estefani Mercedes, Coralina Meyer, Kyle Meyer, Joiri Minaya, Pablo Montealegre, Shayok Mukhopadhyay, Jasmine Murrell, Zahra Nazari, Christie Neptune, Brandon Neubauer, Ana Penalba, Nestor Perez-Moliere, Anna Pinkas, Gustavo Prado, Elise Rasmussen, David Rios-Ferreira, Sarah Sagarin, Annesofie Sandal, Giovana Schluter, Kristine Servia, Dustina Sherbine, David Shrobe, Tiffany Smith, Vered Snear, Rachel Sydlowski, Mikolaj Szoska, Adrienne Tarver, Rosemary Taylor, Heryk Tomassini, Ekaterina Vanovskaya, Alisha Wessler, Doohyun Yoon, Jayoung Yoon

7 Independent Trans Filmmakers You Ought To Know

Trailblazers in their communities through creating media from authentic Trans and QTPOC perspectives and expressing their visions for all to see through their artistic work - Ewan Duarte

By  Guest Writer

December 10, 2016

intended to curate and write an article about a diverse selection of Independent Trans Filmmakers who are making wonderful and impactful work for a wider audience to discover. As well as curating and writing this piece, I’m also including myself and my film/media work in it—since I’m an Independent Trans Filmmaker. I hope you enjoy the diverse selection of Independent Trans Filmmakers below who are trailblazers in their communities through creating media from authentic Trans and QTPOC perspectives and expressing their visions for all to see through their artistic work. It is increasingly vital for Trans and QTPOC filmmakers to be the ones to tell their own stories and experiences through media from their perspectives. Read on to learn more about these seven Independent Trans Filmmakers who are making waves; Seyi Adebanjo, Ashley Altadonna, Shaan Dasani, Mikki del Monico, Ewan Duarte, Sam Feder, and Sydney Freeland!

Here’s 7 Independent Filmmakers You Ought To Know by Ewan Duarte

 

Seyi Adebanjo is a Queer gender-non-conforming Nigerian MFA artist.  Seyi is a media artist who raises awareness around social issues through digital video, multimedia photography and writings. Seyi’s work is the intersection of art, media, imagination, ritual and politics. Seyi has been an artist in resident with Allgo and is exhibiting at the Longwood Art Gallery and previously at the Skylight Gallery -Restoration Plaza Corporation, Bronx Academy of Arts & Dance (BAAD!), MCNY, the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art & Waterloo Arts Gallery.  Seyi is currently a fellow with AIM at the Bronx Museum and has been a fellow with The Laundromat Project, Queer/Art/Mentorship, Maysles Institute, IFP and City Lore Documentary Institute. Seyi’s powerful short Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles has screened on PBS Channel 13, Brooklyn Museum and continues to screen globally.  Seyi’s current documentary Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! is the recipient of the Best Documentary Short- Drama Baltimore International Black Film Festival.  The documentary is screening globally and on a speaking tour.

1. Tell me about your most recent film, Oya. What inspired you to make this film?

“I am from this place but not of it. I am of this place but not from it.” I am a Queer Gender-Non-Conforming Nigerian who returns home to speak directly with my ancestors, connect with Òrìṣà (African God/dess) tradition, and follow a trail back to the powerful legacy of my great grandmother, Chief Moloran Ìyá Ọlọ́ya. This documentary vibrantly investigates the heritage of command, mythology, gender fluidity, womyn’s power in indigenous Yorùbá spirituality. During this personal and political story my journey is to locate the gender fluidity that is an important part of the Yorùbá inheritance (for myself and others.) Gender dynamism supports a traditional legacy of power. As I encounter obstacles of a national strike and anti-gay marriage legislation to find the roots of the practice, will I be able to find affirmation for myself as a person between genders/ worlds and take on this inheritance?

Seeing limiting or no representation of Queer Gender Fluid immigrants, spiritualist, and People of African Descent I knew it was important to strengthen a new story and affirm the identities of people who cross the border of gender/spirit/sexuality. I wanted to tell a tale not often heard about gender and Indigenous Yorùbá Spirituality. With all the post-colonial criminalization laws passed in Nigeria, Uganda, Russia, Ukraine & 75 other nations globally, Queers/Trans/ Gender Non Conforming people are receiving decades and/or life imprisonment. People have been arrested and killed.   Actively showcasing Queer Trans/Gender Non Conforming People Of Color is imperative and urgent because if people continue to think the divine doesn’t love them, how will people get strength to fight, love, live, worship and get out of bed every morning?  For any of us to do this work on an individual, community, and institutional level we need to know we matter and see ourselves reflected.

2. What did you learn the most from working on Oya? 

What I learned the most from working on Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! is to trust myself.  Filmmaking is a very subject field and process where everyone has an opinion on your work and what type of film they would like to see.  During the challenges which come with the production and post-production of a film I was inundated with solicited and unsolicited opinions and theories.  I relearned people will give you their opinion from their worldview. Most of the worldview I received was from the lens of white supremacy and patriarchy.  Through this white gaze, people wanted a poverty porn film about Nigeria, the oppression of womyn, trans folks, queers, female genital mutilation, hardships of my family, a first person narrative about my life, etc; all films which I was not making nor wanted to make. Institutional oppression and other factors make it imperative for me to frame the dialogue when it comes to Queer & Trans* People of Color, especially immigrants.  Representation matters.  Seeing myself and my community visualized is significant and I want to do it with humanity, dignity and power.

Learning to have a small team to view cuts and bounce ideas off were important.  This team had political sensibilities, theory, techniques, practice as artist/ educators. Im grateful to the spirits, people, filmmakers and community members and family who became that core to anchor my process.  The most important lesson, was trusting my own voice/vision.  I recommend to people creating films to have a core team to support you in this endeavor, be as clear as possible in your vision when articulating it to yourself and others.  The people who need to support you will come on board because of the trust and confidence you have about the project.

3. What’s next? 

A short Afro-Surrealism, Docu-narrative film, I will experiment with ritual, the erotic and gender expression through spirituality and mythology. I will transform and re-appropriate mythology and desire for Queer Trans/ Gender Non Conforming People Of Color ritualistically into images of our own creation. Re-imaging the erotic will give strength to a new story and people who cross the border of gender/spirit/sexuality.

4. Can you tell me about your identity and how that is interwoven in your filmmaking process?

I am a media artist who raises awareness around social issues through multi-media photography, digital video and writings.  I thus incorporate media activism with my passion for social justice and community building.  My work is the intersection of art, media, imagination, ritual and politics. My work is lyrical, engaging people in trans-formative, political and spiritual dialogues.  My art communicates with a distinct voice on many themes: gender fluidity, Queerness, spirituality, “Womyn” of Color, transgender People of Color, and white supremacy.

Texas film screening 9/30/16

Texas folks come out for my film screening

The FilmFest — Celebration Africa, 
Bringing the best in thought-provoking films celebrating African culture and experience.

The Waco Cultural Arts Festival's cinema component, will screen four films Friday and Saturday. The Nigerian short film “Oya: Something Happened on the Way to West Africa” will follow the festival’s opening reception at 6:30 p.m. Friday. 9/30/16

Waco Convention Center, Texas Room 116-117

http://www.wacotrib.com/entertainment/accesswaco/festivals/show-off-your-creative-side-cultural-arts-festival-holds-st/article_a82c9b62-efe8-5c48-8c2b-13ebdca8d479.html

http://www.wacoartsfest.org/2016-website-pages/film-fest/

This Friday, May 27th, from 7-9PM!

This Friday, May 27th, from 7-9PM!
For those of you who missed the screening at the African Film Festival, there’s another chance this month to catch the film Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa!

Don't miss three amazing short films by Bronx filmmakers, presented by the Bronx River Art Center and the Bronx Music Heritage Center. Bronx:Africa Film Connections will showcase "Oya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa!" by Tengade Productions - Seyi Adebanjo and two films from the series "The Girls of Daraja" by Barbara Rick. Screening will take place at The Bronx Music Heritage Center, at 1303 Louis Nine Blvd, starting at 7PM!

Free.

RSVP below!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bronxafrica-film-connections-tickets-25608493694

Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! 
Follow my journey as a Queer Gender Non Conforming Nigerian as I connect with Òrìṣà tradition (African God/dess) and the powerful legacy of my great grandmother, Chief Moloran Ìyá Ọlọ́ya. This personal and political story vibrantly investigates the heritage of command, mythology, gender fluidity, Queerness & the hidden truth behind the power of indigenous Yorùbá spirituality. 

May Screenings & Events

1.Exhibitions

 

 #BronxAfrica 

 

Wednesday, May 4: 5:00-9:00pm

Closing Reception for BRONX:AFRICA + First Wednesday Bronx Culture Trolley

6:00pm: What is African Art Today? with LeRonn P. Brooks, curator; Atim Annette Oton, curator of public programming; and Deirdre Scott, executive director of the Bronx Council on the Arts.

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) will feature contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.

Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries inAfrica. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of Africancultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICAcelebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home.

Artists featured in Gallery: Seyi Adebanjo, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, Howard Cash, Elvira Clayton, Dennis RedMoon Darkeem, Lisa DuBois, Nicky Enright, Janet Goldner, Ijeoma Iheanacho, Imo Imeh, Hakim Inniss, Natasha Johnson, Ahmed Tijay Mohammed, Nontsikelelo Mutiti, Ibou Ndoye, Eric Orr, Eto Otitigbe, Thurston Randall, Ibrahima Thiam, Osaretin Ugiagbe, Misra Walker and Tammy Wofsey.
Artists featured online: Olaniyi Akindiya, Kenneth Anderson and Ray Felix.

 

LeRonn P. Brooks, Exhibition Curator
Atim Oton, Curator of Community Engagement
Juanita Lanzo, Longwood Art Gallery Director 

 

Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! 
On View February 3 - May 4, 2016

 

Longwood Art Gallery @ Hostos

450 Grand Concourse, Rm C-190

Bronx, NY 10451

---

Upcoming Screenings

2. Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa!  Official Selection of 2016 New York African Film Festival

Date: Saturday, May 14th

Time: 2:00pm

Location:  Maysles Cinema

343 Lenox Ave, New York, NY 10027

more info:

http://www.africanfilmny.org/

Purchase tickets here

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2540376

3. Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles Official Selection of 2016 Translations The Seattle Transgender Film Festival

The 2016 Translations Film Festival May 12-15, 2016.

Date: Saturday, May 14th

Time: 4:30 pm 5/14 

Part of the Radiant Rebels Shorts Films

Float by Sam Berliner | 4 min.

Monica's Story by Glenn Holsten | 11 min.

Transcend by Kai Towns | 17 min.

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles by Seyi Adebanjo | 7 min.

Whittier Boulevard by Michael Patrick Spillers | 17 min.

One Word: Passing by Cut.com | 4 min.

My Genderation: Alex by Fox Fisher and Lewis Hancox | 3 min.

That's My Boy by Akhil Sathyan | 24 min.

Radiant Rebels Shorts

86 min.

Location: Northwest Film Forum
1515 12th Ave
Seattle, WA, 98122

purchase tickets here:

http://translations.strangertickets.com/films/33066474/trans-lives-matter-justice-for-islan-nettles

 view schedule here:

http://translations.strangertickets.com/schedule?day=2016-05-14

Seyi Adebanjo - Ajamu’s Curatorial Residency- with Visual Aids

Grateful to be part of Ajamu's photography project with Visual Aids. “Activism & art across the waters. “

For his "Archiving Activists Portrait Project," Ajamu photographed 14 young Queer/ Trans/Gender Non Conforming activists of color and interviewed them about their art, activism and objects important to their work. Ajamu premiered these portraits and interviews during "Suitcase Under The Bed: Ephemera Gathering Public Workshop."

View the video here:

https://vimeo.com/161939042

Check out Ajamu's incredible work/ organizing here

http://ajamu-fineartphotography.co.uk/ajamu/

 

JUSTICE AND ISLAN NETTLES: A MESSAGE FROM AVP’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BEVERLY TILLERY

http://www.avp.org/resources/avp-resources/499

on April 05, 2016

Yesterday, when I learned that James Dixon accepted a guilty plea in the death of Islan Nettles, I was struck by a deep and profound feeling of sadness. Even though Islan was killed over two years ago, I was saddened that she was struck down so senselessly, simply because she was trying to live her life.

After years of marches, vigils, protests and demands for justice, our community was braced for the beginning of the trial. As we prepared for several possible scenarios, a guilty plea did not seem to be a likely outcome. Just last week, during a pre-trail hearing, Dixon pleaded not guilty to first- and second-degree charges of manslaughter and a first-degree assault charge stemming from his brutal attack of Islan on the night of August 17, 2013.


This denial of guilt, seemed to be based on the tired and true "trans panic defense," in which male perpetrators of violence against transgender women often claim that they acted irrationally and uncontrollably upon learning that a woman they were attracted to or involved with is transgender.

Last week in a pre-trial hearing, Dixon's attorney attempted to suppress the video of his original confession in which he spewed a number a transphobic comments, excusing his violence to the notion that transgender women deserve to be attacked and even killed simply because they dare to live as their true selves. In in this confession, he disturbingly referred to Islan as "it" as he described coming across her and her friends that night. He first approached her, even flirted with her, but when his friends informed her that she was transgender, he claimed he flew into a rage because his manhood was called into question.

It pains me that young men in our society are still being conditioned to measure their manhood based on antiquated standards steeped in homophobia, transphobia and misogyny and their ability to violently dominate others. After Dixon was taunted by his friends for being attracted to a transgender woman for the second time in one week, he clearly felt he needed to respond violently to defend his own masculinity. But what would have happened if he had been man enough to either admit his attraction to transgender women or simply say he was not interested and walk away.

I am also deeply saddened and troubled by the fact that at the end of this long road to seek justice, another young man of color will be serving a long, term in prison with little hope for reform or restitution. Our criminal justice system will not help him develop a greater understanding of the transgender community so he will be less likely to commit a similar crime when he returns to our community, and his time in prison will not provide the needed resources to the transgender community. And no attention will be paid to the other young men who were there that night who mocked Dixon to change their attitudes and behavior.

I know some members of our community will celebrate this conviction as an example of justice being served. For some others, Dixon's sentence will not be harsh enough payment for the loss of a life. But for me, I'm left asking, "What justice, and for whom?"

Dixon pleaded guilty, bringing one aspect of this case to a close, and at the same time, reopening deep questions and concerns about the how we stop the violence against transgender people, especially the epidemic of violence against transgender women of color, and how we achieve justice in the numerous cases of violence that affect our community.

While we have a legal resolution in this one case, for many, it does not represent the real justice we are ultimately seeking. Transgender women, especially women of color, continue to be targeted each day in our city and across the country. And many cisgender men continue to think it is okay to harm transgender women just because they have the audacity to live their authentic lives.

In honor of Islan Nettles and all the other transgender women who have been attacked and assaulted, and those who continue to live their lives, I hope we can have the hard conversations we need to about how to overcome the transphobia that runs so deep in our society -- so deep, that the mere thought of being attracted to a transgender woman, causes a young man to be embarrassed and angry enough to lash out and kill her. This is the same transphobia that fuels the anti-transgender and anti-LGBT bills being introduced across the country.

While we all have many reasons to be sad and angry today, I'd like to believe that we can use this moment to engage in a real dialogue about how we value transgender lives in our society.

Maybe we no longer allow violence against transgender people to be excused away as a reasonable response to perceived deception. Perhaps Dixon accepted the guilty plea because he and his attorney realized that this justification for violence and homicide against transgender people will no longer be tolerated. Perhaps, it was the presence of Islan's mother along with many members of the transgender community and other allies filling the courtroom that sent a clear message that Islan's life and the lives of other transgender women in our city are valued. Perhaps it was in response to the consistent pressure from the media and a vocal and vigilant community. And perhaps, together, we can create a new vision of justice for Islan and the transgender community.

 

artist talk march 16th @Bronx:Africa

please join me for an artist talk/panel at Bronx: Africa.
come learn more about our work, practice and spirituality.
looking forward to seeing folks
best
seyi

 #BronxAfrica 

http://www.bronxarts.org/bronxafrica.asp

Wednesday, March 16: 6:00-7:00pm

Bronx:Africa Panel Discussion

African Spirituality and Death with Dowoti Desir, Manbo Asogwe; Elvira Clayton, artist; and Seyi Adebanjo, artist. Moderated by Atim Annette Oton, curator of public programming.

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) will feature contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.

Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries inAfrica. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of Africancultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICAcelebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home.

Artists featured in Gallery: Seyi Adebanjo, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, Howard Cash, Elvira Clayton, Dennis RedMoon Darkeem, Lisa DuBois, Nicky Enright, Janet Goldner, Ijeoma Iheanacho, Imo Imeh, Hakim Inniss, Natasha Johnson, Ahmed Tijay Mohammed, Nontsikelelo Mutiti, Ibou Ndoye, Eric Orr, Eto Otitigbe, Thurston Randall, Ibrahima Thiam, Osaretin Ugiagbe, Misra Walker and Tammy Wofsey.
Artists featured online: Olaniyi Akindiya, Kenneth Anderson and Ray Felix.

 

LeRonn P. Brooks, Exhibition Curator
Atim Oton, Curator of Community Engagement
Juanita Lanzo, Longwood Art Gallery Director 


On View February 3 - May 4, 2016

Longwood Art Gallery @ Hostos

450 Grand Concourse, Rm C-190

Bronx, NY 10451

Catch me in Pittsburg 11/24/15

catch me in pittsburgh on nov 24th 7pm @ the Kelly Strayhorn Theater's program

My People: A Film Series in Color.

Ọya: Something Happened on the Way to West Africa!

Kelly Strayhorn Theater :: 5941 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15206

 

November 24 | 7 PM

7p Screening :: 6p Mixer

purchase tix here

Through poetry and storytelling, Ọya: Something Happened on the Way to West Africa! pushes the boundaries of documentary filmmaking, exploring the complex interplay of mythology, gender dynamism, history and psychology in contemporary Nigeria. Cinema verite and traditional interviewing techniques come together in a lyrical poem that reveals a rarely-seen world. Layers of images and audio resonate with truth as audiences peer into the sensuous, under-explored world of Yorùbáland ritual practice through never before seen footage. 30 minutes.

Vow of Silence tells the story of Jade, a heartbroken composer who takes a vow of silence to win back the heart of Isis, her true love. In her struggle to reconnect with Isis, she meets Jaxson-an outgoing musician. Utilizing music, magic and silence-Jade finds her voice in the place she least expects it. Vow of Silence is a music-driven story, placing queer women of color at the center of the narrative. In her inability to speak-Jade communicates her pain, weakness, power and joy through music. An original score by Be Steadwell and live music narrate Jade’s journey. 28 minutes.

Featuring special guests Seyi Adebanjo and Be Steadwell.

Presented as part of My People—a series of screenings, performances, and discussions exploring the life experiences of queer people of color.

Official selection of the San Francisco Transgender Film Festival 11/14/15

Official selection of the San Francisco Transgender Film Festival


Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa!
Saturday, November 14 at 7:30pm at The Roxie Theater.
Bustin’ Out: TRANSGENDER SHORTS
3117 16th St, San Francisco, CA 94103
www.sftff.org/calendar to purchase their tickets!
Tickets are $12-15 sliding scale, and $65 for a Festival Pass.
Schedule
http://sftff.org/2015-festival-schedule/

Catch me & my work at these upcoming events 4 the Fall 2015

1.     Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles film

   Power, Protest, and Resistance: The Art of the Revolution (group) exhibition

       (an NYC exhibition by Rush Arts and Corridor Gallery)

       Opening Reception: Friday, September 25th, 2015 6-7pm
       Fri, Sept 25th, 2015- Sun, Nov 8th, 2015

       Location: Skylight Gallery

      Restoration Plaza Corporation

      1368 Fulton Street

      3rd Floor

      Brooklyn, NY 11216

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1184558753

 

2.   Visiting Artist with The Laundromat Project Field Day 2015 Hunts Point

      Bronx Brilliance: Art, Activism + Action (1-5pm)

      2- 2:45pm this Saturday 9/26

     Location: Serrano Galleries, 835 Dawson Street (off Longwood Avenue)

     https://www.facebook.com/events/932720256799368/

     Field Day is an annual festival showcasing the rich spectrum of local arts      and culture in Bed-Stuy, Harlem, and Hunts Point / Longwood.

 

3.   Photographic Exhibition

     The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance puts the ARTS part of BAAD!

    into action by exhibiting the photos of Seyi Adebanjo

     Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles photographs

     Closing September 30th, 2015

     Location: 2474 Westchester Ave, Bronx, NY 10461

    718-918-2110

      http://www.baadbronx.org/

  

Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! Official Selection

1. A Day of Activism & Inspiration with Reel Sisters of the

Diaspora Film Festival

Oct 3 Celebrating Spirit Section — 1:30 pm – 2:34 pm

Earth, Water, Woman – 22:26 min

Oya: Something Happened on the Way to West Africa – 30:03 min.

Location : ImageNation's Raw Space in Harlem

2031 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. (bet. 121 & 122 Street).

https://reelsisters2.wordpress.com/schedule-oct-3-2015/

 

2. Baltimore International Black Film Festival.

Oct 7-12, 2015

Location: Charles Theatre & the University of Baltimore Learning

Commons.

www.bibff.com

 

3. “I Luv Africa” Film Festival in Ghana

October 21-24,2015

Location: Goethe-Institut Accra Ghana

FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Dates: Oct. 21-24, 2015

 http://luvafricafilmfest.weebly.com/


4. NewFest: The NYC LGBTQ Film Festival

Trans Shorts (10/22)

October 22 @ 4:00 pm

Bow Tie Chelsea Cinemas, 260 W23rd St

New York, 10011 United States

Trans Shorts (10/26)

October 26 @ 9:15 pm

The LGBT Community Center, 208 W 13 St

New York, 10011 United States

http://newfest.org/film/shorts-1/



5. Gender Reel

Minneapolis, MN – October 6th, 8th, 15th and 22nd

Location: Bryant Lake Bowl & Trylon Microcinema.

Omaha, MN — October 18th

Location: the Joslyn Art Museum.

Boston, MA — September 30th & October 1st

Location: Fenway Community Health Center.

Durham, NC — October 10th & 11th

Location: LGBTQ Queer Center of Durham.

Houston, TX --- November 20th, 21st and 22nd.

November 20th — Location: Rice Media Center

November 21st — Location: Frenetic Theatre

November 22nd — Location: Montrose Center

http://genderreelfest.com/?page_id=1752



Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa!

Follow my journey as a Queer Gender Non Conforming Nigerian Seyi Adebanjo as I return home to speak directly with ancestors, connect with Òrìṣà (African God/dess) tradition, and follow a trail back to the powerful legacy of my great grandmother, Chief Moloran Ìyá Ọlọ́ya. . This personal and political story vibrantly investigates the heritage of command, mythology, gender fluidity and womyn’s power in indigenous Yorùbá spirituality. As I encounter obstacles of a national strike and anti-gay marriage legislation to find the roots of the practice, will I be able to find affirmation for myself as a person between genders/ worlds and take on this inheritance?

 

Distribution & Community Engagement

distribution

happy to announce  

Ọya: Something Happened On The Way To West Africa! &

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles

 has been picked up for distribution by Candian Filmmakers Distribution Center (CFMDC).

educational distribution to be confirmed shortly with U.S. distributor.  

 community engagement

i will be doing screening and a speaking tour with the film to educational institutions and community groups starting this fall season.  

please keep me mind and bring me out to your community/educational institutions/ museum, etc..

you can contact me directly adebanjo.seyi@gmail.com

or cfmdc

Aimée Mitchell
Distribution Manager
Educational Development + Outreach
aimee@cfmdc.org

bookings@cfmdc.org

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles @ Skylight Gallery

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles @ Skylight Gallery

Trans Lives Matter! Justice for Islan Nettles multimedia photography by Seyi Adebanjo

Power, Protest, and Resistance: The Art of the Revolution (group) exhibition (an NYC exhibition by Rush Arts and Corridor Gallery) Opening Reception:

Friday, September 25, 2015 6pm-8pm

Show Dates

Fri, Sept 25th, 2015- Sun, Nov 8th, 2015

Location: Skylight Gallery

Restoration Plaza Corporation

1368 Fulton Street 3rd Floor

Brooklyn, NY 11216

I Will Not Be Gendered Up! – Seyi Adebanjo

In this episode NOSTRINGS catches up with Seyi Adebanjo, A queer gender non-conforming Nigerian, discussing gender related issues, talk’s reasons why they do not exactly identify as either male or female in its entirety, the challenges that comes with changing one’s identity, sometimes having to live a double life, what it means to be queer, dealing with the hate, and how people constantly confuses them for something else or try really hard to gender them up. We are taken humorously along with them on their journey of transition.

http://nostringspodcast.com/2015/07/20/i-will-not-be-gendered-up-seyi-adebanjo/

 

Queer representation within art: Is the artist intended or read?

interviews of queer artist including myself in FormatMag

“I don’t think artists should shy away from representing their Queerness in their work. It serves our world when people make “Queer and Brown work,” and are able to show the full complexities of our experiences and lives. We all have the critiques of how dominant culture usually shows heterosexist, homophobic and racist depictions of the Queer and Trans* community. Representing art that breathes life from our perspectives creates a space for us to thrive and hopefully counter those other narratives. People want and need these stories through all art forms, so let’s feed our audience in a conscious and responsible way.”  

https://www.format.com/magazine/dialogue/art/queerness-in-art